Sabin Vaccine Institute

Sabin Vaccine Institute

VISION

for a world free from infectious and neglected diseases

Imagine

The Sabin Vaccine Institute works to reduce needless human suffering from vaccine-preventable and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) by developing new vaccines, advocating for increased use of existing vaccines, and promoting expanded access to affordable medical treatments. See how Sabin contributed to an extraordinary year in global health.

Vaccine Development

Developing safe, low-cost vaccines

NTDs affect an estimated one-sixth of the world’s population, but these diseases do not receive nearly their share of investments in research and development. The Sabin PDP translates scientific research into life-saving products to prevent NTDs and emerging viral infections.

For more than 15 years, the Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership (Sabin PDP) has pioneered the development and testing of low-cost vaccines to prevent and treat NTDs and emerging viral infections. Because NTDs overwhelmingly affect people living in poverty, this research is typically overlooked by pharmaceutical companies.

In partnership with academic institutions, non-profit organizations and governmental agencies around the globe, the Sabin PDP has built a platform to develop and test vaccine candidates and advance them through early product and clinical development.

The Sabin PDP is conducting vaccine research and development for hookworm, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, trichuriasis (whipworm), ascariasis (roundworm), onchocerciasis (river blindness), West Nile virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). As vaccine candidates for hookworm and schistosomiasis advance through clinical trials, the Sabin PDP is evaluating opportunities to partner with developing country vaccine manufacturers for the eventual scale up of production for NTD vaccines and build the case for investment in these products.

Building Global Research Expertise

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Sabin is helping low- and middle-income countries establish vaccine development capacity to respond to the burden of NTDs and prevent future disease outbreaks.

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Less than a year after the Ebola crisis, the spread of Zika once again exposed the critical need for increased vaccine research and development capacity around the world.

To prevent and control future outbreaks, Sabin is committed to advancing global capacity for vaccine research and development. In his role as U.S. Science Envoy, Sabin’s President, Dr. Peter Hotez, is bringing attention to the growing threat of disease in the Middle East and North Africa due to conflict and post-conflict conditions. To build capacity for vaccine research in the region, Sabin is partnering with King Saud University in Saudi Arabia, leveraging a training model established with the University of Malaya in Malaysia.

Peter Hotez, MD, PhD, is president of Sabin and director of the Sabin PDP.

What’s next



The Sabin PDP will train counterparts from King Saud University in vaccine development at its headquarters at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas, in partnership with Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine.

Preventing Snail Fever

Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease carried by freshwater snails, which infects people in as many as 78 countries, with the vast majority of the burden in Africa.

doctor
doctor

In 2015, the Sabin PDP began the first clinical trial in humans for a vaccine candidate to prevent schistosomiasis – also known as snail fever – which infects more than 250 million people worldwide and kills an estimated 280,000 people each year in Africa alone. Schistosomiasis is the second most common parasitic disease after malaria and the deadliest of the most common NTDs.

The Sabin PDP is developing a business case for the schistosomiasis vaccine that will address the global need for the vaccine; the process of research, development and commercialization; financial modeling; and a funding strategy.

What’s next



The Sabin PDP plans to test the vaccine in schistosomiasis-endemic areas of South America and Africa.

Protecting Against Hookworm

Hookworm infection is both a symptom and a source of poverty. Infecting nearly half a billion people worldwide, it is a major cause of malnutrition and anemia in pregnant women and children.

Laboratory

Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi is Deputy Director of the Sabin PDP, based in the Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas, at Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine.

In 2015, the Sabin PDP completed clinical trials in Washington, D.C. and Brazil for its most advanced product, the Human Hookworm Vaccine. These trials evaluated safety and immune response for two promising vaccine candidates to prevent human hookworm infection, which infects one-quarter to one-third of all pregnant women in Africa and can lead to serious health risks during pregnancy and childbirth.

Additional clinical trials are ongoing in the United States, as well as in hookworm-endemic areas in Gabon and Brazil. The successful completion of these trials would be a significant step toward the first vaccine specifically targeting iron-deficiency anemia in low- and middle-income countries, where hookworm infection is widespread.

What’s next



The Human Hookworm Vaccine will be evaluated for its safety and immune response in healthy adults and children in Brazil and Gabon.

Vaccine Advocacy and Education

Expanding access to vaccines

Successful immunization programs require much more than just vaccines. Sabin works to improve the delivery, technical capacity and financing of national immunization programs around the world.

One in five children does not receive basic immunizations. Guided by the principles of equity, sustainability and country ownership, Sabin’s Vaccine Advocacy and Education programs seek to extend the benefit of immunization to everyone.

New vaccines can take years to reach low-income countries. Sabin works to accelerate access to life-saving vaccines for those most at risk, advocating for effective vaccines and better data for decision making, conducting research, training immunization professionals and working with countries to expand and protect their immunization budgets.

Sabin brings together national governments, policy makers, immunization specialists, researchers and advocates to strengthen immunization programs and achieve the 2020 goals set by the Global Vaccine Action Plan.

Fighting Typhoid Together

The Coalition against Typhoid (CaT) works to prevent typhoid through research, education and advocacy.

Typhoid fever, an infection spread through contaminated food and water, kills more than 200,000 people every year, most of whom are children. CaT engages stakeholders to support solutions for typhoid and related diseases, including vaccines and clean water. In 2015, CaT convened more than 200 researchers, policy makers and representatives from international organizations from 43 countries at its ninth international conference in Indonesia. The conference highlighted the spread of drug-resistant typhoid across Africa and Asia, underscoring the urgent need to introduce new vaccines to protect young children and other at-risk populations.

CaT launched a new strategy to increase advocacy activities and expand coalition membership to additional health sectors including water, sanitation and hygiene. A leader in research, CaT initiated the second phase of its Surveillance for Enteric Fever in Asia Project (SEAP) in 2015. SEAP is one of the few studies to characterize the complications and severity of typhoid in addition to disease burden, which will assist countries in making decisions regarding vaccine implementation.

200,000

the the number of people that die every year from typhoid fever.

27

countries have reported drug-resistant strains of typhoid fever.

What’s next



CaT will implement new activities in 2016, such as convening leaders to share best practices and providing advocacy training and resources to typhoid leaders in Africa and Asia.


CaT will continue working on typhoid surveillance in Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Pakistan to determine the burden of disease in these countries.

Fostering Country Ownership of Immunization Programs

The Sustainable Immunization Financing (SIF) program works alongside government officials in 21 countries in Europe, Africa and Asia to achieve country ownership of immunization through domestic immunization financing.

As low- and middle-income countries grow their economies, they become ineligible for the donor funding that had supported many of their immunization programs. These countries are now developing long-term, domestic financing solutions to support immunization. SIF works with health and finance officials in these countries as they navigate this transition.

SIF is supporting 16 of its partner countries in legislative projects. In 2015, SIF played a vital role in the passage of immunization legislation in Uganda and Nepal, providing briefings on novel financing approaches and bringing parliamentarians together with ministry officials to draft and advance legislation.

SIF provides country officials with tools to analyze budgets and advocate for increased government immunization spending. During a 2015 SIF workshop, representatives from Mali, Senegal and Cameroon prepared evidence-based investment cases and practiced advocating for increased immunization budgets. Within six months, all three countries secured budget increases.

What’s next



In 2016, SIF is hosting four regional workshops and its third international colloquium, which will bring together counterparts from each of SIF’s 21 partner countries to exchange ideas and share news regarding their progress on immunization financing.

Photo: Hon. A.B.D. Sesay, parliamentarian from Sierra Leone, speaks at 2015 peer review workshop.

Following a 2015 workshop, three countries secured substantial budget increases for immunization.


Approved Government Routine Immunization Budgets 2015-2016

USD PER SURVIVING INFANT

  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 1
  • 0
  • 3.52

    6.57

    Senegal

    Senegal

  • 7.54

    8.80

    Mali

    Mali

  • 5.97

    7.71

    Cameroon

    Cameroon

What’s next



In 2016, SIF is hosting four regional workshops and its third international colloquium, which will bring together counterparts from each of SIF’s 21 partner countries to exchange ideas and share news regarding their progress on immunization financing.

Sources: Ministry of Health Reports to Sabin SIF field officers

Improving Immunization Programs through Management Training

The International Association of Immunization Managers (IAIM) is the only international professional association dedicated to immunization managers, offering opportunities to connect, share knowledge and strengthen management and leadership skills in order to advance immunization program performance.

IAIM helps members from more than 100 countries prepare for the future by investing in management skills to advance their immunization programs. Better performing programs will be required not only to extend the benefits of life-saving vaccines to the 20 percent of children who do not currently receive them, but also to introduce a new generation of vaccines targeting older children and adults.

2015 was a year of firsts for IAIM, which held its first global conference, attended by members from more than 70 countries, and empowered IAIM members to take ownership of the association, electing their own governing council for the first time. IAIM launched its Training Scholarship Program in 2015, facilitating journeys across the country or around the world for its members to participate in valuable training programs. IAIM also grew its membership in 2015, particularly in Francophone countries.

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IAIM members from 19 countries have participated

in Training Scholarships and Peer-to-Peer Exchanges since IAIM’s launch in 2013.

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Peer-to-Peer

Training Scholarships

Map

What’s next



IAIM will host a regional meeting in China for its members from Asia and the Pacific in 2016. A key theme will be the elimination of measles and rubella as an opportunity to strengthen health systems and promote global health security.


Photo: Theresia Sandra Diah Ratih, IAIM member from Indonesia, at the 2015 global conference.

Special Projects

Sabin helps endemic countries make informed decisions about introducing new and underutilized vaccines.

Special Projects

LEADERSHIP IN DENGUE PREVENTION

Sabin and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) completed the Dengue Surveillance Project in 2015, which created a disease surveillance model to help countries in Latin America and the Caribbean make decisions regarding new dengue vaccines. Sabin also hosted the First Regional Dengue Symposium in Brazil, where attendees from 16 countries learned about new research that will inform decisions on dengue vaccine introduction in endemic countries.

Special Projects

CIRO DE QUADROS VACCINOLOGY COURSE

Since 2011, Sabin’s vaccinology course has trained more than 175 delegates from Latin America and Caribbean on the fundamentals of epidemiology and immunology, current immunization recommendations, funding mechanisms, effective communication, and challenges facing immunization programs. At this year’s course, more than 40 participants were introduced to an entirely new curriculum, which will be the basis of a bilingual vaccinology textbook.

Special Projects

PROVAC INTERNATIONAL WORKING GROUP

Sabin partners with PAHO on the ProVac Initiative, which works with developing countries to strengthen their ability to make data-driven decisions on vaccine introduction. In 2015, Sabin designed a strategy to implement the ProVac methodology in countries engaged in Sabin’s Sustainable Immunization Financing Program, to provide guidance as these countries carry out their own studies to assess the cost-effectiveness of introducing new vaccines.

Special Projects

CONVENING THOUGHT LEADERS

Over the past five years, Sabin has brought together more than 2,000 attendees from nearly 100 countries at more than 20 meetings. In 2015 alone, Sabin convened attendees from more than 25 countries at conferences and meetings concerning the status of the global measles control program, research on rubella, surveillance strategies for meningococcal disease, and more.

What’s next



Sabin looks to expand its work into monitoring and evaluation while continuing to develop evidence to ensure vaccines and immunization strategies are saving more lives more quickly.

Global Network

Putting the spotlight on
neglected tropical diseases

Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) impact more than a billion people around the world, yet they receive scant political or public attention, and programs to prevent and control these devastating diseases are chronically underfunded.

NTDs are inextricably linked to poverty. They impact vulnerable populations, causing disfigurement and disability, and leading to physical and developmental delays in children. Many of these diseases can be treated with medicine donated by pharmaceutical companies; it’s just a matter of getting these drugs to the people who need them. In fact, it costs less than 50 cents per year to protect one person against the most common NTDs.

Sounds simple, right? But more than 800 million children are still at risk of contracting one or more NTD. Through the work of the Global Network, Sabin has been a leading advocacy organization for NTDs, dedicated to raising the awareness, political will and funding required to eliminate these diseases as a public health threat to the world’s poorest communities. Sabin works to achieve this by cultivating advocates at every level – from college students to parliamentarians – to get NTDs onto national, regional and international development agendas.

We also work with in-country partners to improve the success of NTD prevention and treatment programs. For example, the Global Network coordinated with the Indian government and partners in 2015 to arrange a site visit for Indian journalists to learn about lymphatic filariasis (also known as elephantiasis). The journalists interviewed people living with lymphatic filariasis to understand the challenges they face in the rural, remote villages where they live. This resulted in more than a dozen unique media pieces in four languages, encouraging participation in nationwide drug distribution programs.

NTDs on the Global Stage

The Global Network contributed to significant global policy victories in 2015, unifying partners to secure a place for NTDs on the global development agenda.

Photo: NTD Special Envoy Dr. Mirta Roses met with Professor Keizo Takemi, member of Japan's legislature, to urge Japan to prioritize NTDs on the G7 agenda.

“With relatively little material effort, the suffering of hundreds of millions of people could be combatted.”

– German Chancellor Angela Merkel, on the subject of NTDs,
World Health Assembly Opening Address

Leading up to the 2015 G7 Summit, the Global Network facilitated the first-ever NTD community letter to G7 Heads of State. This letter, which brought together more than 100 signatories, was a key component of Sabin’s strategy to ensure a robust, concrete outcome for NTDs. Prior to the Summit, the Global Network and the German NTD Network also raised awareness within Germany of the pressing need for greater access to NTD treatments and the resource gaps for neglected diseases. These efforts came to fruition at the 2015 Summit, where member countries renewed commitments to fight NTDs, pledging to invest in prevention, treatment and research.

Other countries play a vital role in NTD control and elimination. In 2015, the Global Network urged officials from BRICS countries – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – to renew their commitments to combatting NTDs. BRICS leaders incorporated the fight against NTDs into two separate declarations in 2015, demonstrating their commitment to relieving suffering for those in need.

Following a successful two-year effort to secure a place for NTDs in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the Global Network fought for the inclusion of an indicator to measure progress against NTDs. After months of advocacy, the indicator received a green light in late 2015.

What’s next



Sabin is working to persuade global policy makers to translate their commitments to fight NTDs into concrete initiatives, advancing efforts to achieve NTD-related targets in the SDGs and improving health outcomes for people around the world.

Mobilizing the Next Generation of Advocates

Through END7, the Global Network is inspiring and educating a new generation of global health professionals to combat NTDs.

END7, an international advocacy campaign led by Sabin, engages the public to raise awareness of NTDs and urge world leaders to prioritize these diseases of poverty. In 2015, thousands of people around the world joined END7’s advocacy campaign to the UN, asking their ambassadors to support an NTD indicator in the SDGs. Thousands more Americans wrote to their Members of Congress and President to ask that they protect NTD funding.

In 2015, END7’s student outreach program grew to include young leaders at more than 50 universities in 15 countries. Students published op-eds and research papers, led creative advocacy campaigns, and engaged in education and fundraising on university campuses from Scotland to Sierra Leone. To date, END7 students have raised more than $100,000 for NTD treatment programs.

END7 held its first Student Advocacy Day in 2015, bringing 20 students to Washington, D.C., for nearly two dozen meetings with Members of Congress and their staff, urging them to maintain and grow USAID funding for NTDs. This event grew in 2016, with 40 students from 15 universities participating in 39 meetings with key congressional offices. The day concluded with a keynote address from Barbara Bush, co-founder and CEO of Global Health Corps and daughter of President George W. Bush.

The END7 campaign’s “How to Shock a Celebrity” video, featuring celebrities including Eddie Redmayne, Priyanka Chopra and Emily Blunt, reached 7 million views in 2015.

What’s next



END7 will continue to advocate for increased U.S. support of NTD treatment programs. This year, the campaign is approaching $1 million in donations to help deliver medications and support treatment programs.

Making NTDs a Priority

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The Global Network cultivates support for NTD treatment from key governments and influencers.

Through regular engagement with members of the U.S. Congress, the Global Network and its END7 campaign helped protect the USAID NTD budget against proposed cuts in 2015.

With leadership from Sabin’s U.K.-based sister organization, Sabin Foundation Europe, advocacy by the Global Network contributed to the inclusion of NTDs in the £1 billion Ross Fund to fight malaria and NTDs, launched by the U.K. Government in 2015.

As two key international donors to global NTD treatment programs, the Global Network pushed the U.S. and U.K. Governments to continue championing NTDs and encouraged other governments to join the global fight against NTDs, emphasizing the vital importance of increasing resources in order to reach control and elimination goals.

Sabin works closely with stakeholders at the Vatican, resulting in high-profile public statements on NTDs, including a 2015 speech in which Pope Francis included NTDs in a list of health issues requiring “urgent political attention.”

What’s next



Sabin will serve as an official planning partner for the November 2016 International Conference of the Pontifical Council for Health Care Workers at the Vatican on “Diseases of Solidarity” – both rare and neglected tropical diseases.

Special Projects

The Global Network advocated for an increased NTD budget on the Hill through testimonies, community letters, petitions and personal engagement with Members of Congress.


Photo: Sabin President Dr. Peter Hotez testifies before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights and International Organizations on the threat of NTDs.

Sabin Foundation Europe

Promoting proven solutions to the world’s most pervasive health issues

Sabin Foundation Europe is Sabin’s sister organization based in the U.K., supporting the fight against vaccine-preventable and neglected tropical diseases through efforts across Europe.

Sabin Foundation Europe is a U.K.-registered charity founded in 2011 to support vaccine research and development, advocacy efforts and treatment programs for vaccine-preventable and neglected tropical diseases (NTDs).

Sabin Foundation Europe collaborates with global health partners and coalitions to influence U.K. Government policy on neglected health issues by engaging key decision and policy makers. Sabin Foundation Europe was elected in 2015 to chair the advocacy group for the U.K. Coalition against NTDs, a group of U.K.-based NTD researchers, implementers and advocates committed to raising awareness, influencing U.K. Government policy decisions and getting NTD control on the national, regional and international development agendas.

In 2015, funds raised by the Foundation supported programs to prevent and control lymphatic filariasis and soil-transmitted helminths in Guyana and India, in partnership with Sabin City Group and the END7 campaign. Sabin Foundation Europe was also named the official charity partner of the Thomson Reuters Capital Conference, a banking conference in the heart of London’s financial district, where the Foundation was able to introduce the issue of NTDs to a private-sector audience and cultivate new champions.

What’s next



Sabin Foundation Europe will co-author an annual parliamentary NTD report to be launched in 2016 and will forge partnerships in the U.K. to advance Sabin’s mission to end preventable diseases, targeting U.K. decision and policy makers.

Finances

Sabin has received the highest possible rating on Charity Navigator for nearly a decade.

Condensed Statement of Activity December 31, 2015 and 2014

Revenue and Support

2015 2014

Grants, contributions and other support received

17,998,962 19,085,556

Future portion of grants as of year-end

24,145,447 42,181,326

Investment income

23,756 28,526

Total

42,168,165 61,295,408
  • 0M
  • 20M
  • 40M
  • 60M
  • 80M

Expenses

Program services

17,002,515 17,430,180

General, administrative and fundraising

2,047,690 2,063,186

Total

19,050,205 19,493,366
  • 0M
  • 20M
  • 40M
  • 60M
  • 80M

Excess of revenues, commitments and support over expense

23,117,960 41,802,042
  • 0M
  • 20M
  • 40M
  • 60M
  • 80M

Spending efficiency ratio

89%

Program Services

11%

General, Administrative and Fundraising

Sabin's Board of Trustees and executive leadership are fully committed to responsible and effective stewardship of donor funding. For the eigth consecutive year, Sabin received Charity Navigator's highest rating possible for consistently executing our mission in a fiscally responsible way.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position December 31, 2015 and 2014

Assets

2015 2014

Cash, equivalents and other current assets

10,663,140 11,843,934

Investments

8,625,622 12,035,543

Other assets

3,001,301 48,056

Total assets

22,290,063 23,927,533
  • 0M
  • 10M
  • 20M
  • 30M

Liabilities and net assets

Accounts payable and accrued expenses

1,630,503 2,129,111

Other liabilities

213,875 325,250

Total liabilities

1,844,378 2,454,361
  • 0M
  • 10M
  • 20M
  • 30M

Unrestricted net assets

2,148,552 2,290,427

Temporarily restricted net assets

18,297,133 19,182,745

Total net assets

20,445,685 21,473,172
  • 0M
  • 10M
  • 20M
  • 30M

Total liabilities and net assets

22,290,063 23,927,533
  • 0M
  • 10M
  • 20M
  • 30M

Allocation of Program Expenses

45%

Vaccine Development

41%

Vaccine Advocacy and Education

14%

Global Network

The financial statements presented have been summarized from Sabin's audited financial statements. Sabin's full audit report, completed by Rogers & Co, LLP, is available at www.sabin.org.

Leadership

> View all of Sabin’s leadership

Awards and Recognition

Awards

Ambassador Michael W. Marine retired from his role as Sabin’s CEO in April 2016 after helming the organization for six years. We thank Ambassador Marine for his leadership, under which Sabin expanded its advocacy programs for vaccine-preventable diseases and NTDs, grew its vaccine development program through a partnership with Texas Children’s Hospital and Baylor College of Medicine, and launched END7, the world’s largest grassroots advocacy campaign supporting NTD control and elimination programs. Ambassador Marine will continue to serve Sabin’s mission on the Board of Trustees.

Awards

Sabin awarded its 2015 Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal Award to Dr. Roger I. Glass for his pioneering role in research and vaccine development for rotavirus. Rotavirus vaccines, including several that he has helped to develop, are now in use in more than 70 national immunization programs, and have had a major impact in reducing both deaths and diarrheal hospitalizations, improving the health of millions of children worldwide.

Awards

In 2015, Sabin’s President, Dr. Peter Hotez, served as U.S. Science Envoy for the White House and the U.S. Department of State. In this role, Dr. Hotez has worked with the international scientific community to stimulate increased scientific cooperation and foster economic prosperity. He is now laying the groundwork to establish centers of excellence for vaccine development in the Middle East and North Africa. Dr. Hotez will continue to serve in this role in 2016.

Awards

Sabin awarded the Albert B. Sabin Humanitarian Award in 2015 to Dr. Gary Michelson, a distinguished orthopedic spinal surgeon and inventor, in recognition of his extraordinary philanthropy and commitment toward the control and elimination of NTDs through high-level advocacy and vaccine research and development. As an innovator and a philanthropist, Dr. Michelson’s contributions to the field of science and technology have enabled millions of people to live healthier, more productive lives.

Awards

Carol Ruth Shepherd passed away in May 2016 at age 93. Carol Ruth and her late husband, HR Shepherd, founded Sabin in memory of Dr. Albert B. Sabin in 1993 with Dr. Sabin's widow, Mrs. Heloisa Sabin; Dr. Robert Chanock; and Dr. Philip Russell. The Shepherds forged a vision for Sabin’s future, inspiring a commitment to developing vaccines and advocating greater use of existing vaccines and medicine. At age 91, Carol Ruth and many family members proudly attended Sabin’s 20th Anniversary.

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PHOTO CREDITS: Olivier Asselin, Baylor College of Medicine, Mignonette Dooley, Anna Grove Photography, Yannis Guibinga, Esther Havens, Join the Lights, Timothy Mwaura, Víctor Norambuena, Naveen Pun
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