Combating Neglected Diseases

October 11, 2012 | Financial Times

The Financial Times special report “Combating Neglected Diseases” contains in-depth stories and interviews featuring several of Sabin’s key programs, including Sabin Vaccine Development, the Global Network for Neglected Tropical Diseases and the Dengue Vaccine Initiative.

Read the full report here.

The Financial Times


The suffering caused by hookworm is not well known in the developed world but in many countries it is all too prevalent. More than 700 million people are infected with hookworm. The largest number of cases occur in impoverished areas of Sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, China and Latin America. Globally, approximately 3.2 billion people are at risk for hookworm infection.

About Hookworm

Hookworm is an intestinal parasite most commonly found in tropical and sub-tropical climates of Africa, Asia and Latin America.  Hookworm, one of three members of a family of parasites known as the soil-transmitted helminths (STHs), are half-inch long worms that attach themselves to the intestinal wall and feed on human blood. Left untreated, hookworm causes severe intestinal blood loss leading to iron-deficiency anemia and protein malnutrition, particularly in pregnant women and children.

Project Status

The Human Hookworm Vaccine Initiative (HHVI) has identified and produced several candidates for potential use as a vaccine. HHVI is focused on developing and testing a vaccine to prevent moderate to severe hookworm infection in children younger than 10 years old living in endemic areas.

Human Hookworm Vaccine

For more than a decade, the Sabin PDP collaborated with partners from across the globe to develop new, low-cost vaccines that have little commercial market for diseases that primarily impact the world's poorest populations, including humanhookworm, schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis, SARS and Chagas disease. Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development continue this research as of May 2017.

Funding the next scientific breakthrough for the world’s poor

June 12, 2012

At the Sabin Vaccine Institute, advocacy is big part of our business. We encourage politicians, philanthropists and the general public to expand immunization programs for vaccine-preventable diseases and increase treatment for over one billion people suffering from neglected tropical diseases.

But we’re also one of the few NGOs that is leading the research and development of vaccines to prevent diseases of poverty.


This month, the Sabin Vaccine Institute will begin a Phase-1 clinical trial in Washington, DC to further investigate the Na-GST-1 human hookworm vaccine candidate.


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