Call to Action

Pneumococcal disease kills 1.6 million people each year – including 800,000 children under the age of five - and is the leading cause of preventable death worldwide. Vaccines are available now to safely and effectively protect children and adults against most pneumococcal infections. With increased awareness about this disease, and a commitment to purchase and deliver pneumococcal vaccines to children around the globe, we can save an estimated 5.4 million children’s lives by 2030. 

Special Projects

 
Sabin works with partners around the world, including the World Health Organization (WHO), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to convene symposiums that have brought together more than 2,400 of the world’s global health stakeholders to work on advancing vaccination as a cost-effective weapon in public health.
 
Sabin is dedicated to reducing the burden and impact of infectious diseases through the use of new and underutilized vaccines.
In a recent TED Talk, “Let's talk crap. Seriously.”, UK-based journalist Rose George discussed the significance of sanitation and the lack of access to toilets as a root for larger public health problems around the world.
Today, the WHO and UNICEF released The Integrated Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (GAPPD), an integrated and intensified effort to reduce deaths and illnesses from these diseases.
When discussing public health campaigns and disease prevention, most people want to immediately jump to the solution – we want a vaccine, a cure, a narrative – so we can stop the cycle of disease and suffering. But we must remember to crawl before we walk, and this cliché could not ring more true than in the world of disease monitoring and surveillance, particularly for a disease like pneumococcal, a deadly bacterial infection that kills more than 1.6 million people annually, including half a million children.
03.05.13 to 03.06.13
São Paulo, Brazil

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