After struggling with outbreaks for more than a year, Zimbabwe is facing yet another deadly wave of typhoid as it begins 2017. Hundreds of cases have been reported across the country over the past three months, the vast majority of which have occurred in Harare, Zimbabwe’s capital city, where the local government struggles to provide clean water and to contain sewage. Because typhoid is spread through contaminated food and water, the lack of these basic services means that typhoid bacteria can easily spread throughout the city. Although there are two vaccines for typhoid on the market, both of which have proven safe and effective, they are not readily available to Zimbabweans, even those that live in high-risk areas.
As 2016 has come to a close, our team at the Coalition against Typhoid would like to take a moment to reflect on this busy year. It was a year that illustrated, more clearly than ever, that typhoid is a continuing and major threat to millions around the world. Over the course of 2016, an estimated 21 million people – most of them children – suffered from typhoid. Of these, 220,000 died of the disease. We saw typhoid outbreaks in Malawi, Fiji, Zimbabwe and other countries. In endemic countries like India and Nepal, the monsoon season worsened the impact of this disease. In 2016, typhoid struck at ordinary places like schools and weddings, and also at the most vulnerable places, such as refugee camps, reminding us that this disease doesn’t discriminate.
Meet Nurunnahar. Like many school-aged children around the world, this Bangladeshi nine-year-old girl thought she would cool off from the heat of the summer with a glass of lemonade.
Despite the many classic symptoms of typhoid, the doctors could not confirm his illness. In Bangladesh, where many medical facilities don’t have the capability for running diagnostic tests, this is not unusual. But unwilling to give up, Samir’s parents then took him to a specialized pediatric hospital.
My name is Sarah Limbanazo Mwanamanga. I am 54 years old and a research nurse in Malawi, one of the poorest countries in Africa. I have experience working on numerous studies, and now I’m working on a typhoid study In Blantyre, Malawi. I would like to share my own story of typhoid. This story happened about 22 years ago when I was working as a nurse-midwife at Malamulo Hospital. I was 32 years old, married with four children and living with my family including my brother and husband, both of whom I lost due to typhoid.
Do you remember learning how to wash your hands as a child? An adult would have taught you how to run your hands under running water and lather with soap to remove germs. Did you realize then that this lesson might have saved your life?
Typhoid is a disease that strikes the most vulnerable, and refugees are no exception. This autumn, flooding and rains have ushered in outbreaks of typhoid and other diseases in two refugee camps in South Sudan and North Darfur.
One year ago, tasked with the mission of uplifting societies around the world, the United Nations Development Program created a call to action known as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to fight poverty and promote sustainable peace and prosperity for all. These Global Goals, as they’re also known, identify targets for a variety of focus areas to be met by 2030. CaT recognizes that effective typhoid prevention and control, through vaccines and improved water and sanitation infrastructure, is a critical piece of these goals’ successes.
Meet Yadav. A 27-year-old lab assistant in Gurgaon, India, Yadav is remarkably conscientious about avoiding diseases transmitted through contaminated food and water. He cooks at home to avoid eating food bought on the street, where the risk of transmission is much higher. He drinks filtered water, and washes his hands with soap on a regular basis.
The abuse and misuse of antibiotics has led to the creation of bacterial strains that are resistant to standard medication, requiring more expensive and risky treatments for some diseases. Typhoid, a bacterial infection transmitted through contaminated food and water, is one of those diseases.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Typhoid