Georgia is reviewing existing legislation and tracking expenditures to secure sustainable financing for its national immunization program. Sabin’s Sustainable Immunization Financing (SIF) Program began working in Georgia in July 2014.

Immunization Program Structure

The Republic of Georgia’s National Immunization Program (NIP) is located in the National Center for Disease Control and Public Health (NCDC).

Georgia's Progress to Date

Government Spending on Immunization

Legislation for Sustainability

Vaccination Financing Mechanism

Budget Advocacy

Expenditure Tracking

SIF Program Inputs

Government Spending on Immunization

Over the period 2006-2014, Georgia’s Gross National Income rose from US$1,680 to $3,720 per capita, a 121 percent increase. According to the WHO/UNICEF Joint Reporting Form (JRF), the Georgian government spent $13 on routine immunization per surviving infant in 2006. By 2014, this figure had risen to $61, more than a four-fold increase. In addition, the government share of total routine immunization expenditures increased from 58 percent to 77 percent over the period. Since 2010, Georgia has reported consistently on JRF financial indicators. The data suggest that Georgia is progressing towards country ownership of its immunization program. Among SIF countries, Georgia ranked second in terms of routine immunization spending per surviving infant in 2016.

Georgia’s JRF Financial Feedback Report, 2006-2014.

Legislation for Sustainability

The Georgian Law on Public Health mandates that the Government organize and supervise the supply, storage, transportation, of all necessary vaccines as defined by the National Immunization Calendar. The Law also creates healthcare provider accountability for vaccine provision by requiring that they provide timely and comprehensive information about vaccination and submit documentation of preventative vaccination refusals. Moving forward, the Parliamentary Health Care Committee Chairman and Deputy Chairman have committed to building consensus to legislate obligatory immunizations.

Vaccine Financing Mechanism

Until 2010, vaccines were procured through UNICEF Supply Division. Now, Georgia oversees the purchase of vaccines and injection supplies through a state procurement mechanism.

Budget Advocacy

In response to a proposed cut in the immunization budget in 2015, the resident Sabin Senior Program Officer organized a national briefing. The Minister of Finance restored the budget after Members of Parliament highlighted the country’s impending GAVI graduation and the proportionate impacts on child health that would accompany an EPI budget cut.

Expenditure Tracking

SIF provides a tool for analyzing how efficiently recent immunization budgets have been executed. Using the SIF Budget Process Tool, the NCDC team completed an analysis of the 2014 immunization budget. The NCDC is adapting the SIF Budget Process tool to better suit local needs.

In 2016, the NCDC Deputy Director initiated work on new Results-Based Financing approach which will analyze data from district and facility immunization managers.

SIF Program Inputs

  • April 2016: Resident Sabin Senior Program Officer briefs Health Care Committee Chairman and Deputy Chairman
  • November 2015: Resident Sabin Senior Program Officer organizes national briefing
  • April 2015: Resident Sabin Senior Program Officer and MOH counterparts map immunization-related legislation
  • April 2015: Senior Program Officer and MOH counterparts map immunization-related legislation
  • July 2014: Resident Sabin Senior Program Officer introduces SIF program to Georgian government

Last Updated July 11, 2016