In South Asia, where the burden of enteric fever is thought to be highest, most typhoid studies have focused on urban areas. As a result, researchers have been unsure how well available data could be extrapolated to predominantly rural areas.

This is Gul Rahim’s story of typhoid, as told to Attaullah Baig of Aga Khan University Hospital on January 7, 2017, and translated into English. The interview was conducted in Urdu and has been edited for clarity and length.

More than 300 researchers from 45 countries gathered in Kampala, Uganda in early April for the 10th International Conference on Typhoid and Other Invasive Salmonelloses.

After struggling with outbreaks for more than a year, Zimbabwe is facing yet another deadly wave of typhoid as it begins 2017. Hundreds of cases have been reported across the country over the past three months, the vast majority of which have occurred in Harare, Zimbabwe’s capital city, where the local government struggles to provide clean water and to contain sewage. Because typhoid is spread through contaminated food and water, the lack of these basic services means that typhoid bacteria can easily spread throughout the city. Although there are two vaccines for typhoid on the market, both of which have proven safe and effective, they are not readily available to Zimbabweans, even those that live in high-risk areas.
Meet Asim Shrestha. As a practicing pediatrician in Dhulikhel Hospital in Kavre District, Nepal, Dr. Shrestha is all too familiar with the story of typhoid. A steady stream of children pass through his ward, sick with the disease.
The abuse and misuse of antibiotics has led to the creation of bacterial strains that are resistant to standard medication, requiring more expensive and risky treatments for some diseases. Typhoid, a bacterial infection transmitted through contaminated food and water, is one of those diseases.
Every year from July to September across South Asia, the monsoon ushers in rain that boosts the growth of crops and powers the hydroelectric dams. While these annual rains help the economy, their torrential nature often hurts the health of vulnerable communities through dangerous flooding across the region.

From April 30 to May 3, the Coalition against Typhoid (CaT) Secretariat, with coordination and support from PT Bio Farma, convened nearly 250 participants from 36 countries for the 9th International Conference on Typhoid and Invasive Non-Typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) Disease.

By Dr. Jon Andrus, Executive Vice President of the Sabin Vaccine Institute and Director of the Vaccine Advocacy and Education Program

New data from the World Health Organization’s (WHO) Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group reveal that in 2010, unsafe food was responsible for 22 different foodborne enteric diseases– including typhoid fever.

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