About Hookworm

Hookworm is an intestinal parasite most commonly found in tropical and sub-tropical climates of Africa, Asia and Latin America.  Hookworm, one of three members of a family of parasites known as the soil-transmitted helminths (STHs), are half-inch long worms that attach themselves to the intestinal wall and feed on human blood. Left untreated, hookworm causes severe intestinal blood loss leading to iron-deficiency anemia and protein malnutrition, particularly in pregnant women and children.

Project Status

 
The Human Hookworm Vaccine Initiative (HHVI) has identified and produced several candidates for potential use as a vaccine. HHVI is focused on developing and testing a vaccine to prevent moderate to severe hookworm infection in children younger than 10 years old living in endemic areas.

Capabilities

With over a decade of experience, Sabin PDP has produced a well-rounded model that serves as a blueprint for the development of safe and effective vaccines against vaccine preventable and neglected tropical diseases. Existing capabilities include:

Product Development: Established the infrastructure to engage in antigen discovery, rapid development of scalable manufacturing processes (process development), quality control, preclinical and clinical immunology and stability testing.

Human Hookworm Vaccine

For more than a decade, the Sabin PDP collaborated with partners from across the globe to develop new, low-cost vaccines that have little commercial market for diseases that primarily impact the world's poorest populations, including humanhookworm, schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis, SARS and Chagas disease. Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development continue this research as of May 2017.

What We Do

The Sabin PDP is focused on the development of sustainable and cost-effective vaccines for preventing widespread neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), including hookworm, schistosomiasis, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis.

The latest from Dr. Peter Hotez in PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases

June 27, 2012 | PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases

Neglected Tropical Diseases as Hidden Causes of Cardiovascular Disease

Yasmin Moolani, Gene Bukhman, Peter J. Hotez

An important component of the burden of cardiovascular disease in low- and middle-income countries may be attributed to the neglected tropical diseases.

Sabin

Reversing the World’s Neglect of Easily Cured Tropical Diseases

May 18, 2012 | Pacific Standard

Ahead of this weekend’s G8 Summit, Dr. Peter Hotez wrote an op-ed for Pacific Standard calling on G8 leaders to focus on NTD treatment and control as a cost-effective method to improve global health.

Reversing the World’s Neglect of Easily Cured Tropical Diseases

Dr. Peter Hotez

Pacific Standard

Houston Chronicle features research on NTDs in Texas

April 27, 2012 | Houston Chronicle

Dr. Peter Hotez and his role at Baylor College of Medicine’s School of Tropical Medicine were featured in the Houston Chronicle. The article also mentions the new tropical medicine clinic and the vaccine development programs in Houston and calls attention to Dr. Hotez’s PLoS article about NTDs in Texas and Mexico.

Tropical diseases surfacing more in Texas

By Todd Ackerman

Houston Chronicle

Dr. de Quadros and Hotez featured in Vaccine special supplement!

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