In 1957, during a time when polio epidemics ravaged countries worldwide and many considered polio to be the world's most feared disease, Albert B. Sabin began human trials to test his live oral polio vaccine. From 1952 to 1961, the number of polio cases in the United States fell from 58,000 to 161, due in large part to Sabin's vaccine.

The World Health Organization (WHO) and the Public Library of Science (PLoS) are launching a new initiative to support the latest WHO World Health Report by encouraging authors to submit articles that substantiate the WHO's message, that research is essential for better

Albert B Sabin is probably best known for his work and research on the polio virus. During World War II he worked on and developed vaccines for encephalitis (sleeping sickness), sand-fly fever and dengue fever as well. It is his work into dengue fever during this time that is now having possible implications for vaccine development today — 60 years later.

Last week in an op-ed for the International Herald Tribune, Steven L. Weinreb, M.D., provided an important lesson about vaccines and immunity.

Pages