As 2016 has come to a close, our team at the Coalition against Typhoid would like to take a moment to reflect on this busy year. It was a year that illustrated, more clearly than ever, that typhoid is a continuing and major threat to millions around the world. Over the course of 2016, an estimated 21 million people – most of them children – suffered from typhoid. Of these, 220,000 died of the disease. We saw typhoid outbreaks in Malawi, Fiji, Zimbabwe and other countries. In endemic countries like India and Nepal, the monsoon season worsened the impact of this disease. In 2016, typhoid struck at ordinary places like schools and weddings, and also at the most vulnerable places, such as refugee camps, reminding us that this disease doesn’t discriminate.
Meet Nurunnahar. Like many school-aged children around the world, this Bangladeshi nine-year-old girl thought she would cool off from the heat of the summer with a glass of lemonade.
Despite the many classic symptoms of typhoid, the doctors could not confirm his illness. In Bangladesh, where many medical facilities don’t have the capability for running diagnostic tests, this is not unusual. But unwilling to give up, Samir’s parents then took him to a specialized pediatric hospital.
My name is Sarah Limbanazo Mwanamanga. I am 54 years old and a research nurse in Malawi, one of the poorest countries in Africa. I have experience working on numerous studies, and now I’m working on a typhoid study In Blantyre, Malawi. I would like to share my own story of typhoid. This story happened about 22 years ago when I was working as a nurse-midwife at Malamulo Hospital. I was 32 years old, married with four children and living with my family including my brother and husband, both of whom I lost due to typhoid.

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