Guest column from Ciro de Quadros in AllAfrica.

Posted: 06/19/2013

Leaders of developing nations take note: a new study shows that rotavirus vaccines will have a powerful public health impact in your country. This pivotal study, just released in the British Medical Journal, shows that children who were vaccinated against rotavirus were 70 percent less likely to be hospitalized for rotavirus diarrhea compared to unvaccinated children. The vaccines also provided broad protection against rotavirus--even against strains of the virus not included in the vaccine--through the first two years of life, when children face the greatest risk of death from the dehydrating diarrhea rotavirus can cause.
 
The study, funded by the GAVI Alliance, examined the impact of introducing the rotavirus vaccine Rotarix (manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline) into the national immunization program of Bolivia, a lower-middle income country in Latin America. The findings provide the evidence other low and lower-middle income countries, such as those in sub-Saharan Africa, need to evaluate whether rotavirus vaccines are right for their children.