So far this year the number of dengue cases in Singapore has already surpassed the number of cases reported in 2012, and it looks like it will just keep rising. As of last week, Singapore was reporting over 6,000 cases, while 2012 saw around 4,600.
A new study published in Nature online last week estimates that there are more than three times as many dengue infections as in the official World Health Organization (WHO) figure. The WHO estimates 50-100 million dengue infections a year, while “The global distribution and burden of dengue” report argues that there are 390 million dengue infections per year.
Today, Sabin President Dr. Peter Hotez contributed a story to Foreign Policy about how little known neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are wreaking havoc in some of the world's wealthiest nations. This and other stories in today's News Roundup.
As the prominence of dengue grows, the need for an up-to-date and comprehensive understanding of the burden of disease becomes more and more important. For dengue, this means not just mortality but also morbidity; the true cost of the disease lies not just in the lives lost, but in the burden placed on health systems, the days of work missed, and other harder to calculate figures.
As part of the DVI program, a team has been working to develop and advance a model for the impact of dengue vaccine immunization on infection and disease, one that allows the simulation of a wide range of scenarios, including the impact of vector control.
This month marks the one-year anniversary of the London Declaration—an unprecedented pledge by a group of public and private partners to control or eliminate 10 NTDs by 2020. This includes an uptick in drug donations, research and development and bilateral support for NTD programs around the world.

By Alyah Khan

The tremendous scope of the dengue problem becomes clear when you consider the number of places where the virus is present.

09/17/2012

If you’re looking for another interesting blog to read on neglected tropical diseases, vaccines and global health, the Dengue Vaccine Initiative has got you covered.

A debate is emerging about the potential use of genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes to combat dengue in the United States and in other countries around the world. Most recently, news out of Brazil indicated that the country plans to breed GM mosquitoes to stop the spread of dengue.

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