Families across the United States are sending their young children back to school. School preparations are not limited to buying school supplies. Parents should make sure their children are up-to-date with vaccinations.

This past weekend, leaders of the world’s major economies gathered in Hamburg, Germany, for this year’s G20 Summit. Among the issues on the agenda: safeguarding against health crises and strengthening health systems.

Global health research and development has a multiplier effect. It not only saves and improves lives, but also creates cost savings, drives economic growth and enhances global security.

The IAIM Joint Regional Meeting for the Americas and Europe was held from February 1-2, 2017 in Madrid, Spain. Presentations from the meeting are available online.

It was over fifty years ago now, but my mother Susan can still recall that dark, concrete hospital ward at what was then known as the Cincinnati General Hospital. At just six years old, she found herself in a white bed partitioned off from her neighbors by glass. On her left, a young man in an iron lung; on her right, a baby who wouldn’t stop screaming. She remembers falling dangerously ill in the summer of 1960 during a road trip to Williamsburg, Virginia with her family, and remembers the ensuing days of indescribable pain.

While much progress has been made globally in reaching the public with immunizations, one in five children across the world still do not have access to routine immunizations.