Today marks the first day of vaccinations for Phase I, Part II clinical testing of Sabin's human hookworm vaccine in Brazil.

A debate is emerging about the potential use of genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes to combat dengue in the United States and in other countries around the world. Most recently, news out of Brazil indicated that the country plans to breed GM mosquitoes to stop the spread of dengue.
Brazil’s health ministry recently announced its plan to breed genetically modified mosquitoes to stop the spread of dengue fever. According to news reports, scientists are focusing intensely on mosquito control because there is currently no vaccine to protect against dengue.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently announced its development of a new diagnostic test to detect the presence of the dengue virus.
Earlier this week 13 pharmaceutical companies*, together with several government and nongovernmental organizations**, pledged to find solutions to eliminate or control 10 neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) by the year 2020. At an event in London, pharmaceutical companies committed to invest in research and development (R&D) to find new treatments for NTDs along with increasing donations of existing drugs.

 Last century, the invention of the outhouse helped to eliminate hookworm and other parasites in the United States. Now new research shows that the lowly latrine could be a powerful tool in controlling these diseases, which remain widespread among the world's poorest people.

Albert B Sabin is probably best known for his work and research on the polio virus. During World War II he worked on and developed vaccines for encephalitis (sleeping sickness), sand-fly fever and dengue fever as well. It is his work into dengue fever during this time that is now having possible implications for vaccine development today — 60 years later.