Vaccines are healthcare’s first line of defense. From polio to pertussis, rubella to rotavirus, vaccination has saved more lives than any other medical advance in recent history.

Recent findings show that the host of micro-organisms living inside all of us – collectively known as the “microbiome” –play a wide range of roles in human health, from the development of allergies to risk of cardiovascular disease. Dr.

When discussing women pioneers in science, several names in particular seem to always make their way into the conversation: Marie Curie, Nettie Stevens, Rosalind Franklin. However, few have heard of a talented microbiologist and immunologist whose work has helped to save the lives of millions of children and pave the way for future generations of women scientists: Ruth Bishop.

The current generation of vaccines against rotavirus, the leading cause of diarrheal disease in children under five years old, was introduced just a decade ago. In the intervening years, 81 countries have implemented rotavirus vaccination to prevent diarrheal disease.

Since the administration of the first vaccine, immunization policy has evolved to better meet public health needs around the world. This evolution is most apparent when considering immunization policy in developing countries over the past 50 years.

It takes more than a vaccine to make a successful immunization program. This World Immunization Week, we are taking a look at some of the factors that contribute to effective immunization programs.

Despite the fact that safe, effective vaccines exist to prevent rotavirus, the disease continues to kill nearly half a million children each year and hospitalizes millions more.

Results released by the U.S. Government (USG) in September reveal that since fiscal year (FY) 2009, more than $50 billion has been invested by the USG in foreign assistance for health, saving millions of lives.

Yesterday, in New Delhi, India, the Eleventh International Rotavirus Symposium opened, commemorating thirty years of research, development and distribution of vaccines against

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