Recent news reports about Brazil indicate rising concerns about the prevalence of dengue in the country. In mid-February, Brazil’s health minister Alexandre Padilha warned of an impending dengue epidemic due to the discovery of a new type of dengue virus (type 4) in the populous city of Rio de Janeiro.
The World Health Organization recently estimated that over 40 percent of the world’s population is now at risk for dengue, a mosquito-born viral infection that can develop into a potentially lethal complication called severe dengue. As a result, dengue has become a major international public health concern. However, dengue cases are often underreported and monitoring incidents of the disease is challenging. That’s why companies, governmental organizations and concerned citizens are coming up with innovative ways to track dengue outbreaks.
Earlier this week 13 pharmaceutical companies*, together with several government and nongovernmental organizations**, pledged to find solutions to eliminate or control 10 neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) by the year 2020. At an event in London, pharmaceutical companies committed to invest in research and development (R&D) to find new treatments for NTDs along with increasing donations of existing drugs.
Albert B Sabin is probably best known for his work and research on the polio virus. During World War II he worked on and developed vaccines for encephalitis (sleeping sickness), sand-fly fever and dengue fever as well. It is his work into dengue fever during this time that is now having possible implications for vaccine development today — 60 years later.

Last week leaders in global health and tropical medicine convened in Philadelphia to talk about the latest scientific advances in their field as well as the current status of efforts to control tropica

This is the fifth post in a blog mini-series from the Dengue Vaccine Initiative about the collaborative work being done to ensure future access to dengue vaccines in developing nations.

This is the fourth post in a blog mini-series from the Dengue Vaccine Initiative about the collaborative work being done to ensure future access to dengue vaccines in developing nations.

This week in the Global Post, Dr. Fred Were, a pediatrician and specialist in neonatal medicine and National Chairman of the Kenya Pediatric Association (KPA), wrote about the dengue outbreak that swept his country in October. Dr.

This is the third post in a blog mini-series from the Dengue Vaccine Initiativeabout the collaborative work being done to ensure future access to dengue vaccines in developing nations.

This is the second post in a blog mini-series from the Dengue Vaccine Initiative about the collaborative work being done to ensure future access to dengue vaccines in developing nations

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