Mortality rates in Latin America have declined over the past century, due in part to the institutionalization of key public health programs.

More than two billion people lack access to necessary medicines. High costs and limited health care infrastructure prevent many people from benefiting from recent medical advancements, leaving populations at risk of preventable diseases.

Meet Asim Shrestha. As a practicing pediatrician in Dhulikhel Hospital in Kavre District, Nepal, Dr. Shrestha is all too familiar with the story of typhoid. A steady stream of children pass through his ward, sick with the disease.
In the wake of the strongest El Niño event ever recorded, severe drought is strongly affecting parts of Southern Africa, causing crops to fail and water sources to dry up. As a result, food shortages are ramping up precipitously and millions of people are food-insecure. It is a slow-motion public health emergency.

World AIDS Day is held on December 1 every year to show support for those living with HIV, commemorate the estimated 35 million who have died from HIV or AIDS and unite in the global fight against the disease.

Meet Nurunnahar. Like many school-aged children around the world, this Bangladeshi nine-year-old girl thought she would cool off from the heat of the summer with a glass of lemonade.

Recent findings show that the host of micro-organisms living inside all of us – collectively known as the “microbiome” –play a wide range of roles in human health, from the development of allergies to risk of cardiovascular disease. Dr.

Despite the many classic symptoms of typhoid, the doctors could not confirm his illness. In Bangladesh, where many medical facilities don’t have the capability for running diagnostic tests, this is not unusual. But unwilling to give up, Samir’s parents then took him to a specialized pediatric hospital.
When discussing women pioneers in science, several names in particular seem to always make their way into the conversation: Marie Curie, Nettie Stevens, Rosalind Franklin. However, few have heard of a talented microbiologist and immunologist whose work has helped to save the lives of millions of children and pave the way for future generations of women scientists: Ruth Bishop.
My name is Sarah Limbanazo Mwanamanga. I am 54 years old and a research nurse in Malawi, one of the poorest countries in Africa. I have experience working on numerous studies, and now I’m working on a typhoid study In Blantyre, Malawi. I would like to share my own story of typhoid. This story happened about 22 years ago when I was working as a nurse-midwife at Malamulo Hospital. I was 32 years old, married with four children and living with my family including my brother and husband, both of whom I lost due to typhoid.

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