India Launches Massive Public Health Campaign to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis

WASHINGTON, D.C. — January 14, 2015 — India was certified polio-free in 2014. Today, the country has its sights set on another public health victory: the elimination of lymphatic filariasis, a neglected tropical disease (NTD) that threatens nearly half of its population. To meet this ambitious goal, the Indian Ministry of Health & Family Welfare (MOHFW) has launched one of the largest public health campaigns in India’s history to provide more than 400 million people with free medication that could protect them from lymphatic filariasis.

Earlier this month the United Kingdom’s Houses of Parliament met on two separate occasions to discuss global health priorities  with debates on global health research and development and health systems strengthening.

Results released by the U.S. Government (USG) in September reveal that since fiscal year (FY) 2009, more than $50 billion has been invested by the USG in foreign assistance for health, saving millions of lives.

Statement by the Sabin Vaccine Institute on the introduction of the “End Neglected Tropical Diseases Act”

On June 11, 2014, Congressman Chris Smith (R-NJ) introduced a bipartisan bill in the House of Representatives to support the control and elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) in the United States and abroad. H.R. 4847, the “End Neglected Tropical Diseases Act,” calls for the expansion of USAID’s NTD program; increased U.S. Government advocacy for NTDs among international development and financing institutions; reporting from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services on NTDs in the United States; the creation of one or more NTD centers of excellence to increase research and development (R&D); and the establishment of a panel on intestinal worm infections, one of the most pervasive NTDs.
What do neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) have to do with women’s health? A recent review entitled, “Effective Health Interventions for Adolescents That Could Be Integrated with Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Programs”, has just been published looking at how combining multiple health interventions with human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccinations increases the effectiveness of HPV delivery.

Last week, the High-Level Panel of Eminent Persons on the Post-2015 Development Agenda released a report – A New Global Partnership: Eradicate Poverty and Transform Economics through Sustainable Development.

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