It was over fifty years ago now, but my mother Susan can still recall that dark, concrete hospital ward at what was then known as the Cincinnati General Hospital. At just six years old, she found herself in a white bed partitioned off from her neighbors by glass. On her left, a young man in an iron lung; on her right, a baby who wouldn’t stop screaming. She remembers falling dangerously ill in the summer of 1960 during a road trip to Williamsburg, Virginia with her family, and remembers the ensuing days of indescribable pain.
World Polio Day is a day to take stock of our remarkable progress and to rededicate ourselves to the eradication of polio.
When discussing women pioneers in science, several names in particular seem to always make their way into the conversation: Marie Curie, Nettie Stevens, Rosalind Franklin. However, few have heard of a talented microbiologist and immunologist whose work has helped to save the lives of millions of children and pave the way for future generations of women scientists: Ruth Bishop.

In Memoriam: Heloisa Sabin

WASHINGTON, D.C. – October 17, 2016 – The Sabin Vaccine Institute joins a global community of friends, partners and global health advocates in celebrating the life of Heloisa Sabin, (née Dunshee de Abranches) who passed away October 12 at the age of 98. Wife of the late Dr. Albert B. Sabin, who developed the oral live virus polio vaccine, Heloisa Sabin shared her late husband’s dedication to the elimination of needless human suffering and poverty.
My name is Sarah Limbanazo Mwanamanga. I am 54 years old and a research nurse in Malawi, one of the poorest countries in Africa. I have experience working on numerous studies, and now I’m working on a typhoid study In Blantyre, Malawi. I would like to share my own story of typhoid. This story happened about 22 years ago when I was working as a nurse-midwife at Malamulo Hospital. I was 32 years old, married with four children and living with my family including my brother and husband, both of whom I lost due to typhoid.
Do you remember learning how to wash your hands as a child? An adult would have taught you how to run your hands under running water and lather with soap to remove germs. Did you realize then that this lesson might have saved your life?

Did you know that every minute, a child goes blind? Or that 80 percent of global blindness is preventable? This October 13 is World Sight Day, a day established to shed light on the impact of blindness and to raise awareness around the steps we can take to prevent it.

Across the globe, there are 200 million people at risk of trachoma, a preventable, blinding infectious disease. More than three million people are in need of immediate surgery to avoid blindness due to trichiasis, a manifestation of trachoma that causes eyelashes to turn inward, scraping the cornea with each blink. We blink 19,000 times a day

The current generation of vaccines against rotavirus, the leading cause of diarrheal disease in children under five years old, was introduced just a decade ago. In the intervening years, 81 countries have implemented rotavirus vaccination to prevent diarrheal disease.