For many of us born and raised in the United States, vaccines are a familiar part of our doctors’ appointments. But most of us don’t know that there is a complex logistical operation dictating exactly what vaccines we receive and when.

Sabin Vaccine Institute Names Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health as New President of Global Immunization

WASHINGTON, D.C., February 13, 2017 – Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin), a non-profit dedicated to making life-improving vaccines more accessible, enabling innovation and expanding immunization across the globe, today announced the appointment of Dr. Bruce Gellin as President, Global Immunization. Dr. Gellin, a 15-year U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) veteran, has served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health and Director of the National Vaccine Program Office since 2002. Among his roles, Dr. Gellin led discussions on behalf of the United States at high-level global and domestic policy advisory groups and was responsible for developing the National Vaccine Plan, our country's blueprint for all aspects of vaccines and immunization.

Dr. Bruce Gellin, M.D., M.P.H., will join the Sabin Vaccine Institute as President, Global Immunization, on March 1, 2017. Read the press release. Dr. Gellin, a 15-year U.S.

03.01.17 to 03.02.17
Courtyard Marriott Hotel, Tbilisi, Georgia

Over the last 200 years, vaccines have proven to be one of the most effective ways to prevent and control disease.

The International Association of Immunization Managers Hosts Discussions on Vaccine Confidence During Regional Meeting

Madrid, Spain — February 1, 2017 — Today, the International Association of Immunization Managers (IAIM), based at the Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin), began its first-ever regional meeting for members from the Americas and Europe. Immunization experts from around the world have gathered to discuss vaccine acceptance and demand, as well as how to measure vaccine knowledge and perceptions, over the course of the two-day conference.

Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are the most common affliction of the world’s poorest people. Thriving in communities that lack access to health services, adequate sanitation and clean water, NTDs blind, disable and disfigure, trapping families in a cycle of poverty and disease.

The scientific evidence is overwhelming -- there is no link between vaccines and autism. Most people are vaccinating their children on schedule, but the risk to the public is real even if just a few children are not vaccinated.

After struggling with outbreaks for more than a year, Zimbabwe is facing yet another deadly wave of typhoid as it begins 2017. Hundreds of cases have been reported across the country over the past three months, the vast majority of which have occurred in Harare, Zimbabwe’s capital city, where the local government struggles to provide clean water and to contain sewage. Because typhoid is spread through contaminated food and water, the lack of these basic services means that typhoid bacteria can easily spread throughout the city. Although there are two vaccines for typhoid on the market, both of which have proven safe and effective, they are not readily available to Zimbabweans, even those that live in high-risk areas.

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