Today, the WHO and UNICEF released The Integrated Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (GAPPD), an integrated and intensified effort to reduce deaths and illnesses from these diseases.

PDPs Applaud Japan’s First Public-Private Partnership to Spearhead Innovation in Global Health

A new public-private partnership of the Japanese Government, the Bill &Melinda Gates Foundation and a group of private pharmaceutical companies seeks to foster and harness Japanese innovation to address diseases that disproportionately affect low- and middle-income countries.
A polio endgame, soaring measles cases, a breakthrough in HIV vaccine research and other vaccines and global health news in this week's News Roundup.

Huffington Post: Where Are the Scientist-Advocates and Civic-Scientists?

The flattening in support for biomedical research as well as other research fields in the United States over the last decade is having serious consequences for American science and scientists. Ultimately, we need a new generation of scientist-advocates and policy experts if we expect to reverse this trend.

The number of polio cases has plummeted in the last 25 years, from 300,000 to less than 300. Even so, last May the World Health Organization declared that global eradication of polio, reaching that last 0.1 percent, was a “programmatic emergency for global public health.”

ABC News Tweet Chat on NTDs

Neglected tropical diseases were today’s featured topic for ABC News’ weekly health “tweet chat”. ABC’s chief medial correspondent, Dr. Richard Besser hosted the chat and posed various questions and conversation topics to participants about NTDs. Sabin President Dr. Peter Hotez and Global Network Managing Director Dr. Neeraj Mistry also participated.

Peter Hotez for Foreign Policy: The Disease Next Door

They're probably the most important diseases you've never heard of -- causing everything from greusome limb disfigurement and skin sores to bladder and liver cancers to neurological damage -- and they're practically ubiquitous among world's poorest people. Typically, such infections last for years or even decades, causing chronic and permanent disabilities such as stunted growth and intellectual developments in children; blindness, heart disease, and disfigurement of adults; and pregnancy complications that can result in severe disease in both newborns and their mothers.
When it comes to scientific research, not all schistosomes are treated equally.

In a recent blog post, Bill Gates describes his visit to Ghana, where he hoped to learn more about the country’s health delivery systems.

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