Harare, Zimbabwe has struggled to control an epidemic of typhoid fever that has affected the metropolitan area since October, 2011. Zimbabwe’s Health Ministry has reported 1,865 cases of typhoid fever thus far, averaging between 30 and 50 new cases per day, according to media sources. Although no deaths have been reported, the epidemic’s continued spread has had profound effects on local productivity and quality of life.
Earlier this week 13 pharmaceutical companies*, together with several government and nongovernmental organizations**, pledged to find solutions to eliminate or control 10 neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) by the year 2020. At an event in London, pharmaceutical companies committed to invest in research and development (R&D) to find new treatments for NTDs along with increasing donations of existing drugs.
Yesterday Bill Gates released his annual letter, highlighting the philanthropic work of the Bill & Melinda Gates Organization and announcing his expectations for continued improvements in global health, agricultural research and U.S. education in the next year. Throughout the letter, Gates reiterated that innovation was the key to achieving their goals of improving the lives of people around the world.

Last week, Coalition against Typhoid (CaT) member Rob Breiman, M.D.

As mentioned in the last blog post, India has gone one full year without a single polio case, thanks in large part to an army of volunteer vaccinators that fanned o

In 1957, during a time when polio epidemics ravaged countries worldwide and many considered polio to be the world's most feared disease, Albert B. Sabin began human trials to test his live oral polio vaccine. From 1952 to 1961, the number of polio cases in the United States fell from 58,000 to 161, due in large part to Sabin's vaccine.
Albert B Sabin is probably best known for his work and research on the polio virus. During World War II he worked on and developed vaccines for encephalitis (sleeping sickness), sand-fly fever and dengue fever as well. It is his work into dengue fever during this time that is now having possible implications for vaccine development today — 60 years later.

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