Hookworm

From 2000 to 2017 the Sabin Vaccine Institute partnered with the Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas to develop safe, effective and low-cost vaccines for infectious and neglected tropical diseases. Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development continue this research as of May 2017.

Past Work

For more than a decade, the Sabin PDP collaborated with partners from across the globe to develop new, low-cost vaccines that have little commercial market for diseases that primarily impact the world's poorest populations, including human hookworm, schistosomiasis, onchocerciasis, SARS and Chagas disease. Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital Center for Vaccine Development continue this research as of May 2017.

Research & Development

The Sabin Vaccine Institute supports innovative technologies and approaches in vaccine research and development to combat infectious and emerging threats to global health. Sabin’s R&D strategy is to advance the development of vaccine candidates that have demonstrated early scientific value but have little commercial value, targeting diseases that impact the world's most vulnerable populations. Sabin leverages the expertise of partners in the academic, public and private sectors, and promotes open-source research.

Vaccine Knowledge & Innovation

The immunization landscape is constantly evolving. Immunization professionals are faced with the challenge of staying up-to-date on new vaccines, changing policies and recommendations, and developments in vaccine science, while the general public is inundated with information, making it difficult to discern truth from fiction.

Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) are the most common affliction of the world’s poorest people. Thriving in communities that lack access to health services, adequate sanitation and clean water, NTDs blind, disable and disfigure, trapping families in a cycle of poverty and disease.

Sabin Vaccine Institute President Dr. Peter Hotez gave the keynote address on NTDs at the Pontifical Council for Health Care Workers’ XXXI International Conference, focused on NTDs and rare diseases.

On November 10, Sabin Vaccine Institute President Dr. Peter Hotez will give the keynote address on NTDs at the Pontifical Council for Health Care Workers’ XXXI International Conference, focused this year on NTDs and rare diseases. The Pontifical Council for Health Care Workers was established by Pope John Paul II to help coordinate the Vatican’s health care related activities. Its work is rooted in the Church’s mission to care for the sick by dedicating its efforts to help health care workers and those serving the sick and suffering. The Pontifical Council for Health Care Workers’ XXXI International Conference will be one of its capstone events, as the Council will be assumed by the Dicastery for Promoting Integral Human Development on January 1, 2017.

These Blood Suckers Cost $2.5 Billion to $138 Billion Each Year

Three guesses on which blood suckers are costing the world somewhere between $2.5 billion to $138 billion each year. Vampires? Well, the Twilight novel and movie series portrays vampires as a bit more “emo” and “preppy” than vicious. How about vampires? No, there have been limited vampire economic studies. Vampires? No, repeating the same guess won’t make it correct.
Forbes
The annual meeting of the Health Ministers from the Group of 7 (G7) countries took place from September 11-12, 2016, in Kobe, Japan. The Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin) was pleased to see the G7 Health Ministers Kobe Communiqué reiterate a continued emphasis on strengthening efforts to control infectious diseases through international cooperation. As the Health Ministers concluded, “Health is the foundation of human security…We are determined to commit to a healthier world, where all people can receive the basic quality services they need, and are protected from public health threats.”
During my many years as a diplomat, I saw firsthand how the power of collective action can be extraordinarily important in shaping momentous changes. A few examples include: the creation of the PEPFAR program to combat HIV/AIDS, the accelerated response to terrorism following the East African embassy bombings, effective international coordination to tackle the SARS and avian flu threats, and the constructive collaboration between the United States and Vietnam on the issue of Agent Orange.

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