The Sabin Rising Star Award, first awarded in 2020, honors an early-career professional who has demonstrated a commitment to the field of immunization and who exemplifies the Sabin Vaccine Institute’s mission to make vaccines more accessible, enable innovation and expand immunization across the globe. We seek nominations that reflect the diversity of global health work, unrestricted by gender, location or field of work.

Nomination Criteria

The Sabin Rising Star Award honors an early-career professional who has demonstrated a commitment to the field of immunization. It is awarded based on the following criteria:

  • The Nominee’s work exemplifies the Sabin Vaccine Institute’s mission to make vaccines more accessible, enable innovation and expand immunization across the globe
  • The Nominee is working to materially improve access to vaccines, impact vaccine research and development or enable innovation to expand immunization
  • The Nominee should be a scientist, researcher or public health leader

In Sabin’s Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Anti-Racism Action Plan, released July 2020, we pledged to promote greater diversity among the organizations and leaders Sabin partners with and the programs Sabin delivers, which includes this award program. In past years we have worked to increase the quantity and diversity of nominations but acknowledge we can do more to improve the diversity, equity and inclusion of our nomination process and those selected for recognition. When considering those you wish to nominate please take special care to contemplate all people making an impact in the immunization space.

Submit a Nomination

Nominations for the 2021 Rising Star Award are closed. If you have any questions, please email [email protected].

Nominations are submitted in strict confidence and reviewed by a selection committee comprised of Sabin executive management and Board of Trustees.

Recipients of the Sabin Rising Star Award

2020 - Katherine E. Gallagher, M.Sc., Ph.D.

Dr. Katherine Gallagher has demonstrated a commitment to improving human health by informing immunization policy through scientific evidence.

For her doctorate in epidemiology with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, she assessed barriers to Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine delivery based on experiences from 45 low- and middle-income countries. Her findings informed the WHO global vaccine recommendations and the application process for Gavi support.

When the Ebola epidemic in West Africa peaked during Dr. Gallagher’s fieldwork in Tanzania, she volunteered to help set up a Phase I Ebola vaccine trial until the full-time trial manager was recruited. After finishing her doctorate, she coordinated Phase II trials for the same vaccine in Sierra Leone.

Her experience during her doctoral program gave Dr. Gallagher a deep interest in the sustainability of vaccine programs. Many low- and middle-income governments receive the majority of their national vaccination budget from Gavi, and as their economies grow, become ineligible for Gavi support. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) is one of the most expensive vaccines on the market at $10 per fully immunized child. To address this global problem, Dr. Gallagher is now conducting a trial of fractional doses of PCV in Kenya, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
 

Read the press release