The worst U.S. flu season in a decade appears to be winding down, but the truth is, it’s always flu season. Even now, as Americans begin to put away the thermometers, hand sanitizers and cough drops, researchers are preparing for the next flu season. As early as February, they began trying to predict which influenza strains will dominate so they can create the right cocktail for next season’s vaccine.
Last night, more than one hundred guests joined together to honor Dr. Paul Offit as the recipient of the 2018 Sabin Gold Medal. Colleagues, family, friends and peers gathered at the National Academy of Sciences building in Washington, D.C., to celebrate Dr. Offit’s contributions to immunization, including his achievements as the co-inventor of an oral rotavirus vaccine and his leadership as a vocal and dedicated advocate for immunization.
Every year, the Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal is given to a distinguished member of the public health community who has made extraordinary contributions in the field of vaccinology or a complementary field. This year's award will honor Dr. Paul Offit for his contributions as co-inventor of an oral rotavirus vaccine and his leadership as one of the United States’ most vocal and dedicated advocates for immunization.

Dr. Ruth Nussenzweig died on April 1, 2018 at age 89. Dr. Nussenzweig was the 2008 recipient of the Sabin Gold Medal for her pioneering research that led to the development of the RTS,S malaria vaccine.