This spring and summer, the Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin) has been amplifying the voices of parents who immunize through the Give Your Kids A Shot campaign on Twitter

Happy Father's Day, Dads! On this special day where fatherhood is cherished, we asked several dads why they got their kids vaccinated. Here is what they had to say.
I still remember the power of the heat; the air was thick and slapped you in the face as soon as you stepped outside. The rain may have cooled you briefly but brought with it a fresh surge of humidity leaving the air even heavier than before. It was my fourth year of medical school, and as I walked to the hospital wards, I could never in my life imagine what I was about to see.

These days, vaccines are on everyone’s mind. Vaccine misinformation and disinformation are on the rise and it’s more important than ever for every parent to have access to accurate information to make informed decisions about immunization.

Sabin’s IAIM Network is the largest international network of immunization managers, offering opportunities to connect, share knowledge and strengthen skills required to effectively implement immunization programs.

World Polio Day, on October 24 2018, marks a day for celebration of past achievements toward eradication of this vaccine-preventable disease, but also calls into discussion the measures that must be taken to maintain global vaccination and help protect those who are at risk from this disease.

Dr. Albert Bruce Sabin, best known as the developer of the oral live virus polio vaccine, died 25 years ago. Over the course of a career that spanned nearly six decades, his discoveries and approaches to research shaped the modern world.

Families across the United States are sending their young children back to school. School preparations are not limited to buying school supplies. Parents should make sure their children are up-to-date with vaccinations.

It was over fifty years ago now, but my mother Susan can still recall that dark, concrete hospital ward at what was then known as the Cincinnati General Hospital. At just six years old, she found herself in a white bed partitioned off from her neighbors by glass. On her left, a young man in an iron lung; on her right, a baby who wouldn’t stop screaming. She remembers falling dangerously ill in the summer of 1960 during a road trip to Williamsburg, Virginia with her family, and remembers the ensuing days of indescribable pain.