This spring and summer, the Sabin Vaccine Institute (Sabin) has been amplifying the voices of parents who immunize through the Give Your Kids A Shot campaign on Twitter

Happy Father's Day, Dads! On this special day where fatherhood is cherished, we asked several dads why they got their kids vaccinated. Here is what they had to say.

Globally, rotavirus is the leading cause of diarrheal disease and the second leading infectious killer of infants and children under five children each year.

Last night, more than one hundred guests joined together to honor Dr. Paul Offit as the recipient of the 2018 Sabin Gold Medal. Colleagues, family, friends and peers gathered at the National Academy of Sciences building in Washington, D.C., to celebrate Dr. Offit’s contributions to immunization, including his achievements as the co-inventor of an oral rotavirus vaccine and his leadership as a vocal and dedicated advocate for immunization.
Every year, the Albert B. Sabin Gold Medal is given to a distinguished member of the public health community who has made extraordinary contributions in the field of vaccinology or a complementary field. This year's award will honor Dr. Paul Offit for his contributions as co-inventor of an oral rotavirus vaccine and his leadership as one of the United States’ most vocal and dedicated advocates for immunization.

Vaccines are healthcare’s first line of defense. From polio to pertussis, rubella to rotavirus, vaccination has saved more lives than any other medical advance in recent history.

Recent findings show that the host of micro-organisms living inside all of us – collectively known as the “microbiome” –play a wide range of roles in human health, from the development of allergies to risk of cardiovascular disease. Dr.

When discussing women pioneers in science, several names in particular seem to always make their way into the conversation: Marie Curie, Nettie Stevens, Rosalind Franklin. However, few have heard of a talented microbiologist and immunologist whose work has helped to save the lives of millions of children and pave the way for future generations of women scientists: Ruth Bishop.

The current generation of vaccines against rotavirus, the leading cause of diarrheal disease in children under five years old, was introduced just a decade ago. In the intervening years, 81 countries have implemented rotavirus vaccination to prevent diarrheal disease.

Since the administration of the first vaccine, immunization policy has evolved to better meet public health needs around the world. This evolution is most apparent when considering immunization policy in developing countries over the past 50 years.

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